City of Hayward

Hayward City Workers Donate 280 Toys to Children in Low-Income Families

 

SEIU 1021 members in Hayward donated 280 toys to be distributed to local charities to be given to low-income families

SEIU 1021 members in Hayward donated 280 toys to be distributed to local charities to be given to low-income families

HAYWARD, CA — City Workers who have lost 17% of their incomes due to imposition earlier this year donated 280 toys at Hayward’s City Council meeting Tuesday night — one toy on behalf of each SEIU 1021 member that works for the city.

The toys are being donated in the name of Doris Rodriquez, a former Hayward City Councilmember, who passed away this week.

“Doris worked tirelessly on behalf of working families and improving the lives of children of Hayward,” said Gil Hesia, President of SEIU Local 1021’s Maintenance Chapter for Hayward.

The toys will be donated to the South Hayward Parish, where Rodriquez was a board member. Several charities — including Salvation Army, Glad Tidings and La Familia  — will be distributing the toys to some of South Hayward’s poorest families.

The toys were presented during the public comment period at the Hayward City Council meeting Tuesday night.

Rodriquez stood by SEIU 1021 members and spoke out in several council meetings against the City Council imposing a 17% paycut on its workforce earlier this year. The council voted unanimously in February to impose cuts.

“Since imposition, we understand the hardship of having to go without necessities,” Hesia said.

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‘We Will Lose Everything’: Hayward Workers Speak, Protest Inequality, Wage Cuts

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Hayward Families and Community Face Hardship and Foreclosure as Politicians Unfairly Cut Pay 25%. Local Businesses Lose $13.9 Million

Hundreds of Hayward workers, their neighbors and community allies, marched on Hayward City Hall on Friday, March 14th, against the sitting politicians who have imposed unfair wage cuts that worsen economic inequality.

Since 2010, Hayward workers have seen their pay cut by up to 27.3%, with the latest cuts imposed unilaterally by the Hayward City Council over the recommendations of an independent management consultant.  These cuts are devastating to working families already struggling with high housing and living costs, and will continue to hurt local businesses, estimated to have lost $13.9 million in revenue so far.

Representatives from the offices of Alameda County Supervisor Richard Valle, Ellen Corbett, Bill Quirk and other elected officials were on hand to speak and offer support of Hayward’s working families.

The crowd heard stories like that of Erika Johnson, a Records Clerk in Hayward Police Department, employed with the city for 6 years. Johnson is a single mom with three children — one requiring special medical care — and commutes from Tracy. On paper, she makes $29 an hour but with the concessionary cuts, she is trying to feed a family of four on $15 an hour.

“They are breaking our backs and our will. I don’t have the ability to pay for food for my kids.  They say I make too much for food stamps so I have to go to a food bank. When I started, I was paid $1800 every two weeks. I was able to afford my mortgage payment. Then they cut 12%  and I made $1500. I was still able to pay my mortgage. Now I make $1,300 every two weeks. An entire paycheck goes to my mortgage that won’t even be paid in full, then we have nothing to live on for two weeks.

“There is no way to come out of this. Bills aren’t going away, so we will sink slowly like quicksand until we lose everything.”

Friday, March 14th was the the first payday where Hayward workers will see their smaller paychecks.  Most saw cuts of 5 to 10%, which follows a 17% average loss in wages before 2012.

Hayward’s local small businesses will suffer as a result of these imposed inequities.  An estimated $13.9 million in revenue has been lost to local businesses since 2010, and that number will rise with the latest cutbacks.  These widespread impacts in difficult economic times are one reason that more than 2,000 Hayward residents have signed to pledge, “We Stand with Hayward Workers.” (www.WeStandWithHayward.org)

“Where’s the justice?” asked SEIU Local 1021 Hayward Chapter President Gil Hesia.  “Working families are losing up to one-quarter of every dollar of pay.  This is how economic inequality spreads, especially as housing and other prices skyrocket. We work hard, we pay our taxes and we have given back time and again. Now our families are suffering without reason. These are unfair attacks against workers.”

SEIU Local 1021 President Roxanne Sanchez called for the workers to be treated with justice, noting that, “City officials dragged their employees through a time-consuming and ugly labor dispute.  There is room for both wage restoration and helping the city’s long-term finances.  That solution needs to be civilly agreed upon by the city and the union.”

The Council imposed the latest round of cuts on workers in contradiction to a neutral, independent consultant, who recommended a reasonable contract.

The consultant, a factfinder picked by management, recommended a fair contract because the Hayward City Council routinely underestimates revenue every year, a poor management practice that allows unaccountable spending on pet projects.  It is estimated that between 2010 and 2014, the Council collected $19.4 million in unanticipated revenue.  From 2013-2018, this figure is expected to hit an additional $43 million, according to an independent economic analysis from the non-partisan firm Beacon Economics.

The Alameda County Democratic Party and Alameda Central Labor Council have both called on Hayward to negotiate honestly to reach a fair contract. Instead, on Feb. 18, the City Council imposed cuts on workers, in a 7-0 vote.

The next protest with the Hayward community will occur at the City Council meeting of Tuesday, March 18.

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President Statement Regarding Tonight’s Hayward City Council Hearing To Impose A 5% Cut On Workers

Join Hayward workers in protest against imposition TONIGHT! Tuesday, Feb. 18, 5:30 PM @777 B St., Hayward, 94541

RoxanneSanchez_06112012Statement from SEIU Local 1021 President Roxanne Sanchez:

Today, the Hayward City Council is holding a hearing to impose their own terms and conditions on Hayward’s city workers. The Alameda County Democratic Party, the Alameda Central Labor Council, members of the community and their own employees — all have urged them not to do so.

The Hayward City Council’s move unilaterally forces a one-year contract on their workers instead of finding a framework for an agreement, bypasses the ‘fact-finding process’ as well as rules for collective bargaining.

Assistant City Manager Kelly McAdoo’s claim that the city has made multiple offers that was rejected by union leadership is patently false. If the employer was truly willing to sit down and work with their employees, they had more than 8 months to do it.

A neutral, third party factfinder (similar to a mediator), selected by both the City and Union, concluded that the City of Hayward has the ability to begin wage restoration. Rather than take the 70-page document seriously, the city rejected the recommendations and one day after the report went public, posted the notice of an imposition hearing.

City officials misused the bargaining and factfinding process as a means to an end — to impose a concessionary contract. They distorted labor and financial realities in order to justify a 5% cut to workers’ pay and wages on top of the 12% they already took from workers.

That is a total of a 17% cut in take-home pay for many who are among the city’s lowest paid employees. That additional cut equals several hundred dollars each month and could be a lost home, car or college tuition.

City officials dragged their employees through a time-consuming and ugly labor dispute. Labor, community and political organizations urged the council to do the right thing and get back to the table. On Jan. 8, 2014, the Alameda County Democratic Party passed a resolution urging the City Council to reach a fair agreement with their workforce.

The resolution, submitted by Supervisor Richard Valle, Assemblyman Bill Quirk, Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski and State Senator Ellen Corbett, reads in part, ‘the Alameda County Democratic Party stands with the workers in the City of Hayward in the fight for a fair contract and calls on all parties involved in the dispute to reach amicable resolution to this difficult situation through honest negotiations at the bargaining table, and to pursue a solution without resorting to imposition.’

There is room for both wage restoration while also helping the city’s long-term finances. That solution needs to be civilly agreed upon by the city and the union, as proposed in the fact-finding report. The union has offered to accept the report and put it to our members for a vote.

I urge the Mayor and City Council to vote ‘no’ to impose and immediately get back to the table to work on a fair agreement.

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SEIU 1021’s Hayward chapter represents more than 350 city workers, from librarian assistants, water sanitation and water treatment workers, street maintenance and road crews, crime scene technicians, 911 dispatchers and administrative staff.

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Factfinder: Hayward Workers Deserve Wage Increase; City Instead Moves Towards Imposition

HAYWARD — A factfinding report from a neutral, third party recommends the City offer employees wage increases over a 3-year contract. Although the report repudiates the city’s ‘last, best and final offer’ — which includes a demand of a 5% cut — late Friday, Feb. 14, the City posted notice of an action item to consider imposition of these terms during their Tuesday, Feb. 18 City Council meeting.

SEIU Local 1021 members and community supporters plan to attend in full force to oppose the imposition and to urge the City Council to work with the framework the factfinding report. Join Hayward workers at 5:30 PM for a rally to oppose imposition! 777 B St., Hayward, CA 94541

City employees and community supporters plan to attend in full force to oppose imposition and to urge the City Council to work with the findings of the fact-finding report. Imposition means unilaterally imposing contract terms on city workers.

“We have tried to work with city officials over and over, but since July 2013, they have refused to meet with us nor move off their original position of ‘no.’ That’s not bargaining,” said John Stead-Mendez, Deputy Director of SEIU Local 1021 and lead negotiator for the Hayward bargaining team. “The report represents a good compromise, which we can accept. We are calling on the city to get back to the table to hash out a fair deal, using this report as a framework.”

Rather than the city’s demand of 5% in concessions, the factfinding report recommends the city begin to restore wages over the life of a three-year contract. Workers have lost 12% in wages and benefits since 2010.

The fact-finder was selected by both parties to examine proposals from both sides during a three-day hearing. The report is a recommendation to the City, but the City still, even after the report was released to both parties 10 days ago, refuses to meet. The union has requested to bargain with the City since July but city management has not responded. SEIU 1021 members are currently working without a  contract, which expired on April 30.

The fact-finding panel’s recommended deal includes (p29):

•          Year 1 (FY 2014): $750 signing bonus for employees in exchange for the Clerical unit making 20% contributions to dental insurance premiums and 50% contributions to vision insurance premiums.

•          Year 2 (FY 2015): 1% raise on July 1, 2014 and an additional 1% raise on January 1, 2015. The panel also recommends the City reduce its maximum contribution to health insurance premiums to the family rate of the fourth-highest plan available through PERS, starting in January 2015.

•          Year 3 (FY 2016): 2% raise on July 1, 2015 with an additional 2% raise to be paid in Feb 2016 if the City sees 8% revenue growth from FY 2013-2015 and provided there are no further changes to CalPERS pension actuarial assumptions.

•          The panel does not recommend the clerical and maintenance units contribute to retiree health benefits

            Key quotes from the report:

The City’s use of ten-year financial projections is misguided, “The Panel has concentrated its focus on the first five years of the City’s 10-year plan due to the inherent unreliability of projections further than five years into the future” (p20).

The City has under-projected revenues, especially property tax revenue, “City Finance Director Tracy Vesely indicated that further unanticipated increases in property tax revenue in FY 2013 were tentatively causing her to upgrade her projection of FY 2014 property tax revenues by $2 million over the 10-year plan.  The $2million also would be added in projections for later years” (p21).

 Despite some recent equity adjustments, the consequences of concession over the past few years has meant workers’ compensation has trailed behind inflation, “The panel finds that the CPI does not support the City’s position, particularly with regard to maintenance workers, since FY 2013 concessions have actually decreased the employees’ purchasing power despite the appearance on paper that their wages have surpassed inflation. In addition, some employees received small or no equity increases” (p10).

Maintenance and Clerical staff would pay a larger burden than police and fire for retiree medical benefits, “The comparability evidence does not support an employee contribution for retiree medical insurance. In addition, if required of the Maintenance and Clerical units, the police and fire units would be contributing a smaller portion of the normal cost of their retiree medical benefit than these units” (p28).

FFFinal-Hayward and SEIU1021

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Winning Public Opinion, One Campaign at a Time

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As we fight concessions and attacks on working people, it is important to carry a strong public message that gets ahead of management’s anti-worker vitriol. Contract campaigns are key to engaging the public because they create an opportunity to raise important economic and social issues that affect all residents, not just our members.

Recent contract fights in the City of Hayward and Mendocino County featured not only strikes — three days and one day — but active messaging campaigns with strong slogans: “We Stand With Hayward Workers” and “Mend Mendocino.” The strikes effectively showed our collective strength and resolve, and the media covered our main point: As budgets and finances improve, governments cannot stand by failed austerity measures that continue to harm workers and the local economy.

The media and the public often misunderstand who we are and what we do — and what we often put up with. Once they saw the connection in our messaging, our contract campaigns became public campaigns that continue to build steam.

In Hayward, the public campaign site (WeStandWithHayward.org) includes an online petition and testimonies from prominent community leaders and business owners. To date nearly 2,000 Hayward residents have signed campaign petitions protesting the city’s attack on workers.

In Mendocino County, workers have labored under leadership urging everyone to “stay the course” — one that’s cut the county’s workforce by more than one quarter in three years. Continuing real wage cuts are significantly impacting retention of workers, which hurts services further.

That message resonated with business owners and residents already fed up with a bad economy and lack of accountability from their elected officials. The public campaign site (MendMendocino.org) explains what workers have lost and includes a petition for all to sign.

In both cases, SEIU 1021 contract campaigns are driving change. Both offer lessons in how to engage the public and pressure bad bosses to do the right thing for their communities as well as their employees.

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‘We Stand With Hayward Workers’ Campaign Building Momentum

Hayward blitz_bannersm

More Than 1,200 Hayward residents and businessowners have signed the “We Stand With Hayward Workers” petition, after a successful community blitz this past weekend and the launching of the public web site, www.WeStandwithHayward.org.

Members from SEIU Local 1021, Local 21 ILWU 10 and others fanned across Hayward neighborhoods Saturday, knocking on doors, asking people to sign the petition as well as to put up lawn signs, currently on display throughout the city.

Many businesses already have a sign up in their windows, in support of workers.

“I am a union man for 30 years, and I know what it’s like to go through tough times, but the economy is picking up,” said Alfredo Rodriguez, owner of Vintage Alley in downtown Hayward. “The city workers have been giving and giving, you can only give so much. The city needs to do the right thing.”

Hayward workers and residents are collecting signatures for a petition to deliver to City Council to make clear it is the duty of city officials to prevent — not create — economic harm to the community. That includes offering city employees a decent wage so they can contribute to the local economy.

While city administrators continue to push more cuts, effectively doubling down on their failed austerity policies that are slowing economic recovery, Hayward workers are joining the community in the fight to call on our elected leaders to reinvest in Hayward.

City employees were already coping with the down economy before the City took 12% in wages and benefits.  Now, as the cost of living continues to rise, like all working people, we are struggling to pay gas to get to work, food for our families and utilities to keep the lights on, let alone help the economy grow.

The additional 5% cut could be a lost home, car or college tuition.

Our financial research shows that taking more from city employees is not justified. We ask our elected leaders to stand up now with our community to stop the cuts that hurt our economic recovery.

Workers are not just fighting for their livelihoods; there is a negative effect in our community when working-and middle-class wages get stripped away.

When hundreds of workers lose, so do businesses and the local economy.

We need real reform by demanding our leaders to prevent unnecessary economic harm to our community!

Please sign our petition, at:

www.change.org/petitions/we-stand-with-hayward-workers

 

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SEIU 1021 Members Join Hayward Community to Petition for Economic Recovery

On Tuesday, Oct. 22, Hayward workers delivered a petition to City Council from more than 700 Hayward residents to make clear it is the duty of city officials to prevent — not create — unnecessary economic harm to the community. That includes offering city employees a decent wage. IMG_5631Hayward workers are fighting back the city’s current demand for pay cuts bringing the total to 17 percent in just a few years.

SEIU 1021′s City of Hayward members and their allies gathered the signatures by walking their neighborhoods and talking with their neighbors about the need for real leadership from city officials. With more than 15,000 union households (nearly half of them SEIU), Hayward city is a union town.

Our message remains clear: Hayward management must return to the bargaining table to negotiate a fair agreement. We ask our elected leaders to stand up now with our community to stop the cuts that hurt our economic recovery.

In August, SEIU 1021 members held a three-day strike against unfair labor practices (ULP) after city managers refused to bargain and declared impasse in contract negotiations on July 26. Members’ families were already coping hard with the down economy before the city began taking back more than $7 million — 12 percent of their wages — in 2010. Now administrators are demanding another five percent cut. Workers will lose up to $1,700 a month if these proposals are imposed on them.

Currently we are deep in fact-finding as we continue to engage the community in our Stand with Hayward Workers campaign. Follow our campaign on Facebook at facebook.com/seiu1021.

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Hayward Workers, Community Members, Protest City Council TONIGHT

Stand With Lawn signs black borderAbout 200 workers and their allies will protest against the city’s refusal to bargain with employees and further cuts to wages and services at tonight’s 7 PM City Council meeting.

During public comment, workers and residents will urge City Councilmembers to come back to the table for productive negotiations. Workers ended a three-day strike last month that caught the attention of community members, who joined the “We Stand With Hayward Workers” campaign to support them.

Workers’ incomes have been stripped away since 2010 — first by furlough days, then a 12% cut in take-home pay. The city is now demanding 5% more — a total of 17% loss in take-home pay for workers who are already having a hard time paying bills, mortgages or rent, some have lost homes to foreclosure and still others have been priced out of Hayward as the cost of living rises as their incomes dwindle.

The city declared impasse on July 26, refusing to negotiate and has not reached out to workers since the end of the strike on Aug. 15. Workers say the city’s lack of movement forced them to take action, and that fight continues today.

SEIU 1021 represents more than 350 full-time and part-time Hayward workers who fix roads and sewers, trim trees, find homes for stray animals, read to children at libraries and safeguard our neighborhoods.

WHAT: Protest and Action Against Cuts to Jobs and the Community

•   ·        6 PM – Rally and demonstration in front of City Hall, 777 B. Street, Hayward.

•   ·       6:30 PM — March up to Council chambers

·          7 PM — Workers will speak at City Council meeting

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Hayward Worker Speaks: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

LindaReidLinda Reid, longtime permit technician and president of SEIU 1021’s Hayward Chapter, talks to a crowd of workers, community members and labor allies on Aug. 14, 2013, the second day of Hayward’s ULP Strike.

We are here today not just for a livable wage for Hayward city workers, we are here on behalf of all workers who are frustrated by the ever-widening economic disparity between our employers and the workers who actually get the work done. The people at the top who think they can keep squeezing us lower and lower, to where we can’t afford to keep our jobs or to live and raise a family in the community we work.

While Hayward city administrators are doing their best to separate us from the community, to label us as a burden to the taxpayers who should just give up a 17% wage cut, the members of the community see something different.

The residents, business owners and workers of this community understand why we are here.

Jobs and families are fleeing Hayward, and this city has a responsibility to reinvest in the people who make the community thrive. That includes paying and treating workers fairly!

The working people of Hayward are like those throughout the country – we are the economic engine of our community. We are the ones who patron downtown businesses and restaurants, attend nearby schools and colleges.

We see that our struggles are the ones everyone faces: The ability to care for our families without economic fear. We live in fear of losing our jobs, and our employers capitalize on that. We live paycheck to paycheck.

Employers like the City of Hayward are just fine giving six-figures to the top brass and extravagant retirement packages, but when workers just try to defend what they have fought so hard to keep – that is when we all must rise to the occasion to fight back.

Yesterday, during our first day of our strike, many of us had conversations with the people of this community – in coffee shops, restaurants, on the street and in the grocery store.

As employers attempt to pit worker against worker, you might think a bunch of purple people taking over downtown would frustrate those folks who aren’t members of our union.

Instead, I heard stories of frustration with the City, of their lack of vision to turn this community around, that they are glad we are standing up. From a barrista in a coffee shop to a bagger at Luckys to a former city worker who lost her job but came down to support us in her purple SEIU 1021 shirt — they all have a desire for change.

That gives me hope. That should give you all hope, too.

We are leading the way in how the community shapes its future.

Hearing these stories helps to take the sting out of how city administrators are treating us at the bargaining table and during this strike.

We asked them to come down here today to talk with us. As you can see, they declined our offer….

So in closing, I want to remind you as we walk the picket lines and talk with our neighbors, we are not alone.

Along with the community, as union leaders, we also carry a storied history to organize a better future for all working people.

Over the years, workers have been exploited, threatened and have DIED for the right for us to be here today. We stand on the shoulders of giants.

We carry the legacy of working people from the last 150 years who have fought so hard for all of us to have 40-hour weeks, a weekend and safety measures in the workplace, and to stand up when we encounter retaliation and intimidation from our bosses.

We all deserve a job that allows us to live above the poverty line so we can pay the medical bills when our children are sick; put gas in the car so we can get to work, put food on the table and save money for the ever-increasing costs of college and retirement.

And today, we continue to talk with businessowners and residents who support us by putting up “We Support Hayward Workers” signs in their windows and in their cars.

You are a part of a long and distinguished union legacy, an inherited a tradition that we continue today on those picket lines!

Today I want to thank you today for standing up for yourself, your families and for working people everywhere.

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9 AM Update: Hayward Chapter President Calls on City Manager and Mayor to Put an End to 3-day ULP Strike

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“We are in the second day of our Unfair Labor Practice Strike. While we continue to hold our picket lines, we want get back to work for the residents of Hayward,” said Linda Reid, Hayward chapter president. “That’s why we are asking the city’s decision makers – the City Manager and Mayor — to come down here in front of City Hall at 12 noon today to talk with us and get back to the bargaining table.”

Workers and community members, labor allies and anyone who wants to join in the fight for better jobs and fair wages will gather at City Hall today, Aug. 14, at 12 noon where they will then march to the Hayward Library, just a block away. There is a second rally planned at 5 PM. Join us and stand with the hard working men and women who help make the City of Hayward work. The City of Hayward workers’ fight is everyone’s fight.

After seven long months of the city’s delay tactics at the bargaining table, city administrators declared impasse on July 27, effectively forcing workers to strike. The City of Hayward has refused to bargain with its workers, who have already given back more than $7 million – or 12% of their wages — since 2010. This year they are demanding another 5%.

SEIU’s Hayward chapter represents more than 350 city workers, from librarian assistants, water sanitation and water treatment workers, street maintenance and road crews, crime scene technicians, 911 dispatchers and administrative staff.

Press availability for Tuesday. Aug. 13, 2013

· 12 NOON — City Hall, 777 B Street. Press availability, Call to action to Mayor, City Manager during labor rally. Picket lines held.

· 5 PM — City Hall, 777 B Street. Press availability, labor and community allies join in, picket lines and labor rally.

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