COPE

The Committee on Political Education (COPE) is made up of SEIU members, staff and retirees who contribute monthly to ensure that we have the political power to protect our hard-earned political and legislative victories that improve public services and the lives of working families.

We know that who we elect and what they do when they are in office determines much in our everyday lives: from our livelihoods to our health and safety. We know when we speak with one voice about what working people need, our elected officials listen.

 

Election Volunteer Activities: November 2 to 6

This is it, folks. Only one more week until Election Day. Hurricane Sandy missed California but Hurricane Prop. 32 is still heading straight for us, and Prop. 30 must pass if we don’t want $6 billion in budget cuts to annihilate our schools.

From Friday through Election Day, Local 1021 offices will become Election Central for phone banks and precinct walks to get out the vote and make a difference. California may be a “safe” state on the national radar but the passage of Prop. 30, defeat of Prop. 32, and election of local candidates like Susan Gorin (Sonoma BOS) and Rhodesia Ransom (San Joaquin BOS) is anything but certain. We are the ones who can make it all happen.

Local 1021 offices in Oakland, San Francisco, Fairfield, Sacramento and Santa Rosa will be in high gear all day Friday through Monday (Saturday-Monday in Stockton); and all offices will be running GOTV poll checks and lit drops from early morning until the polls close on Election Day. Other GOTV activities take place in the cities of Napa, Hayward, Richmond, Manteca and Tracy.

Every vote counts. Every vote is needed. Please vote on Tuesday, November 6.

San Francisco (350 Rhode Island, #100 South Bldg.)
Volunteer Info: Gabriel.Haaland@SEIU1021.org
Get Out The Vote Activities
Fri. Nov. 2 – 8a-6p
Sat. Nov. 3 – 8a-6p
Sun. Nov.4 – 8a-6p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 8a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 8a-8p

EAST BAY
Oakland (447 29th Street)
Volunteer Info: Ariana.Casanova@SEIU1021.org or 510-915-8400 for all East Bay activities
Get Out The Vote Activities
Fri. Nov. 2 – 8a-6p
Sat. Nov. 3 – 10a-6p
Sun. Nov.4 – 10a-6p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 9a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 9a-8p

Oakland (100 Oak Street, 3rd Floor)
Phone Banks
Mon. Nov. 5 – 9a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 8a-8p
Precinct Walks
Sat. Nov. 3 – 11a-4p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 9a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 8a-8p

Richmond (1021 Macdonald Ave.)
Precinct Walk: Sat. Nov. 3 – 9a-3p
For additional Richmond activities, report to 447 29th Street, Oakland, where you will be assigned.

Hayward (28870 Mission Blvd.)
Phone Banks for Richard Valle & Prop 32
Sun. Nov. 4 – 1-4p
Precinct Walks
Sat. Nov. 3 – 10a-2p
Sun. Nov. 4 – 1-4p

SOLANO & NORTH BAY

Fairfield (2300 Boynton Ave. #200)
Volunteer Info: Michael.Weinberg@SEIU1021.org
Get Out The Vote Activities
Fri. Nov. 2 – 8a-6p
Sat. Nov. 3 – 8a-6p
Sun. Nov.4 – 8a-6p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 9a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 9a-8p – Help distribute doorknob hangers beginning 9a.

City of Napa (1830 Soscol Avenue, Suite A)
Volunteer Info: Michael.Weinberg@SEIU1021.org
Get Out The Vote Activities
Sat. Nov. 3 – 9a-6p
Phone Banks
Mon. Nov. 5 – 9a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 9a-8p
Precinct Walks
Sat. Nov. 3 – 9a-6p
Sun. Nov. 4- 9a-6p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 5-8p

Santa Rosa (600 B Street)
Volunteer Info: Paul.Rodriguez@SEIU1021.org
Get Out The Vote Activities
Fri. Nov. 2 – 5:30-7:30p
Sat. Nov. 3 – 10a-5p
Sun. Nov.4 – 10a-5p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 9a-5p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 –  9a-8p

CENTRAL VALLEY

Manteca (Manteca Educator’s Association, 576 Commerce Court)
Volunteer Info: Andrea Colavita Pinkham 209-461-7734
On Monday and Tuesday, Manteca will be the headquarters for GOTV in San Joaquin County. The Stockton office will be open for phone banking Saturday-Tuesday but no activities are planned.
Get Out The Vote Activities
Mon. Nov. 5 – 10a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 10a-7:50p

Sacramento (1006 4th St., 8th floor)
Volunteer Info: John.Shaban@SEIU1021.org
Get Out The Vote Activities
Fri. Nov. 2 – 8a-6p
Sat. Nov. 3 – 8a-6p
Sun. Nov.4 – 8a-6p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 8a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 8a-8p

Stockton (37 Hunter Square Plaza)
Volunteer Info: Andrea Colavita Pinkham 209-461-7734
On Monday and Tuesday, Manteca will be the headquarters for GOTV in San Joaquin County. The Stockton office will be open for phone banking Saturday-Tuesday but no activities are planned.
GOTV Rally (Stockton)
Mon. Nov. 5 – 5-7:30 – Weber Point, 221 N. Center Street, Stockton
Phone Banks
Sat. Nov. 3 – 10a-6p
Sun. Nov.4 – 10a-6p
Mon. Nov. 5 – 8a-6p
Election Day, Tues. Nov. 6 – 8a-8p

Tracy (Rhodesia Ransom HQ, 29 West 10th Street)
Volunteer Info: Andrea Colavita Pinkham 209-461-7734
On Monday and Tuesday, Manteca will be the headquarters for GOTV in San Joaquin County. The Stockton office will be open for phone banking Saturday-Tuesday but no activities are planned.
Precinct Walks
Sat. Nov. 3 – 10a – Walk and literature drop to union households – Rhodesia Ransom HQ, 29 West 10th Street, Tracy
Sun. Nov. 4 – 11a – Same as above, different time

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Local 1021 Endorsements

Local 1021 has announced its November election endorsements, and topping the list are the fights to pass Proposition 30 and defeat Proposition 32, plus two board of supervisors races that could tip the balance of power in two of our most difficult counties: Susan Gorin in Sonoma and Rhodesia Ransom in San Joaquin.

View a complete list of all Local 1021 endorsements by county:
Alameda County
Amador County
Butte County
Calaveras County
Contra Costa County
Del Norte County
Marin County
Mendocino County
Napa County
Sacramento County
City and County of San Francisco
San Joaquin County
Shasta County
Solano County
Sonoma County
Yolo County

Alameda County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress, House of Representatives
CD 11 – George Miller
CD 13 – Barbara Lee
CD 15 – Pete Stark
CD 17 – Mike Honda

U.S. Congress, Senate
Dianne Feinstein

State Senate
SD 7 – Mark DeSaulnier
SD 9 – Loni Hancock

State Assembly
AD 14 – Susan Bonilla
AD 15 – Nancy Skinner
AD 16 – Joan Buchanan
AD 18 – Rob Bonta, Abel Guillen (dual endorsement)
AD 20 – Bill Quirk
AD 25 – Bob Wieckowski

Board of Supervisors
District 2 – Richard Valle

Alameda County Ballot Measures
B1 – YES (Transportation tax)
F – YES (City of Albany sales tax)
I – YES (Chabot/Las Positas parcel tax)
J – YES (Oakland school bonds)
M – YES (City of Berkeley watershed bonds)
N – YES (City of Berkeley pool bonds)
O – YES (City of Berkeley parcel tax for pools operations)
P – YES (City of Berkeley Gann tax override)
Q – YES (City of Berkeley technical change in utility tax)
R – NO (City of Berkeley)
S – NO (City of Berkeley)
T – NO (City of Berkeley)
U – NO (City of Berkeley)
V – NO (City of Berkeley)

BART Board
District 3 – Rebecca Saltzman
District 5 – John McPartland
District 7 – Maria Alegria
District 9 – Tom Radulovich

Oakland City Council (ranked choice voting)
District 1 – 1. Dan Kalb
District 3 – 1. Nyeisha DeWitt, 2. Alex Miller-Cole, 3. Derrick Muhammed
District 5 – 1. Mario Juarez
District 7 – Sheryl Walton, Larry Reid (open endorsement)
At-Large – 1. Rebecca Kaplan

Oakland City Attorney (ranked choice voting)
1. Jane Brunner

Oakland School Board (ranked choice voting)
District 1 – 1. Jody London
District 3 – 1. Jamoke Hodge, 2. Richard Fuentes
District 5 – 1. Rosie Torres
District 7 – 1. Alice Spearman

City of Berkeley, Mayor
Kriss Worthington

Berkeley City Council
D-2 – Darryl Moore (incumbent)
D-3 – Max Anderson (incumbent)
D-5 – Laurie Capitelli (incumbent), Sophie Hahn (open endorsement)

Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board
Alejandro Soto-Vigil, Judy Shelton, Asa Dodsworth, Igor Tregub

City of Fremont, Mayor
1. Bill Harrison, 2. Anu Natarajan (ranked choice)

Fremont City Council
John Dutra, Sue Chan, Vinnie Bacon (open endorsement)

Fremont School Board
Lily Mei (incumbent), Reshma Kripineni, Ann Crosbie

San Leandro City Council
D-2 – Ursula Reed
D-4 – Darlene Daevu
D-6 – Jim Prola

Hayward School Board
Sara Lamnin, Peter Bufete, John Taylor

San Lorenzo School Board
Jim Sherman (incumbent), Penny Peck

Peralta Community College Board
Area 1 – Bill Withrow
Area 2 – Jurena Storm
Area 4 – Nicky Yuen
Area 6 – By Gulassa

Ohlone College District Trustee
Area 2 – Kevin Bristow, Greg Bonaccorsi, Teresa Cox

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Amador County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Butte County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Calaveras County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

Board of Supervisors
District 1 – Gary Tofanelli
District 2 – Bryce Randall

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Contra Costa County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 11 – George Miller

State Senate
SD 3 – Lois Wolk

State Assembly
AD 11 – Jim Frazier
AD 14 – Susan Bonilla
AD 15 – Nancy Skinner
AD 16 – Joan Buchanan

Richmond City Council
Marilyn Langlois, Eduardo Martinez

Ballot Measures
A – YES (Contra Costa parcel tax)
D – YES (San Ramon bond)
I – YES (Chabot/Las Positas)
N – YES (Sugar tax)
P – YES (Overturn Citizens United)

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Del Norte County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 2 – Jared Huffman

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Marin County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 2 – Jared Huffman

State Assembly
AD 10 – Michael Allen

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Mendocino County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 2 – Jared Huffman

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Napa County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

State Senate
SD 3 – Lois Wolk

State Assembly
AD 4 – Mariko Yamada

Board of Supervisors
District 2 – Mark Van Gorder

City of Napa
Mayor – Peter Mott
City Council – Scott Sedgley, Alfredo Pedroza

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Sacramento County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 3 – John Garamendi
CD 7 – Dr. Ami Bera

State Assembly
AD 7 – Roger Dickinson
AD 9 – Dr. Richard Pan

Sacramento City Council
District 2– Rob Kerth
District 4 – Joe Yee

Sacramento City USD School Board
Patrick Kennedy, Eric Sunderland, Gustavo Arroyo, Diana Rodriguez

School District Measures
Measure Q – YES (School Facilities Bond)
Measure R – YES (School Facilities Bond)

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

City & County OF San Francisco

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

State Senate
SD 11 – Mark Leno

State Assembly
AD 17 – Tom Ammiano
AD 19 – Phil Ting

Board of Supervisors
District 1 – Eric Mar
District 3 – David Chiu
District 5 – Julian Davis, Christina Olague, John Rizzo (triple endorsement, unranked, alphabetical order)
District 7 – No endorsement
District 9 – David Campos
District 11 – John Avalos

BART Board
District 7 – Maria Alegria
District 9 – Tom Radulovich

SFUSD Board of Education
Sandra Fewer, Matt Haney, Gladys Soto, Shamann Walton

SF Community College Board
Natalie Berg, Rafael Mandelman, Steve Ngo

San Francisco Measures
Prop A – YES (Community College Parcel Tax)
Prop B – YES (Parks Bond)
Prop C – YES (Affordable Housing Fund)
Prop D – No endorsement (Municipal Elections)
Prop E – No endorsement (Gross Receipts Tax)
Prop F – NO (Hetch Hetchy)
Prog G – YES (Corporate Personhood)

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

San Joaquin County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 9 – Jerry McNerney
CD 10 – Jose Hernandez

State Senate
SD 5 – Cathleen Galgiani

State Assembly
AD 9 – Dr. Richard Pan

Board of Supervisors
District 5 – Rhodesia Ransom

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Shasta County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)


Solano County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 3 – John Garamendi

State Senate
SD 3 – Lois Wolk

State Assembly
AD 4 – Mariko Yamada
AD 11 – Jim Frazier

Board of Supervisors
District 1 – Erin Hannigan

City of Fairfield
Measure P – YES (Protect Fairfield)

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Sonoma County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 2 – Jared Huffman

State Senate
SD 3 – Lois Wolk

State Assembly
AD 4 – Mariko Yamada
AD 10 – Michael Allen

Board of Supervisors
District 1 – Susan Gorin

Sonoma City Council
Laurie Gallian, Madolyn Agrimonti

Santa Rosa Measures
Measure Q – YES (District Elections)

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

Yolo County

U.S. President & Vice President
Barack Obama & Joe Biden

U.S. Congress
CD 3 – John Garamendi

State Senate
SD 3 – Lois Wolk

State Assembly
AD 4 – Mariko Yamada

Statewide Propositions
30 – YES (Schools & Local Public Safety Protection Act)
31 – NO (Risks to worker safety and environment)
32 – NO (Special Exemptions Act)
33 – NO (Favors auto insurance companies over consumers)
34 – YES (Death penalty repeal)
35 – YES (Human trafficking penalties)
36 – YES (Three Strikes revision)
37 – YES (Genetically engineered food labeling)
38 – NO (State income tax increase)
39 – YES (Funds clean energy jobs, closes corporate tax loophole)
40 – YES (Upholds redistricting of State Senate seats)

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2012 Election Volunteer Opportunities

Find a phone bank or precinct walk at a Local 1021 office near you:

Oakland (447 29th Street)
Phone Banks: M/T/W/Th – 5:30-8:30p
Precinct Walks: TBA
Volunteer Info: Ariana at ariana.casanova@seiu1021.org

Fairfield (2300 Boynton Ave. #200)
Phone Banks: M/T/W/Th – 5:30-8p
Precinct Walks: Sa 9a-2p, Su 2-5p
Volunteer Info: Mike at michael.weinberg@seiu1021.org

Sacramento (1006 4th St., 8th floor)
SEIU 1021 Phone Banks: M/T/W/Th – 5:30-8p
Central Labor Council Phone Banks: M/T/W/Th/F – 5-8p – 2840 El Centro Road, Suite 111, Sacramento
Precinct Walks: Sa 9a-3p, SEIU 1000, 1325 S Street – Su 1-5p (start 9/16) – Sacramento CLC, 2840 El Centro Road, Suite 111, Sacramento
Volunteer Info: John at john.shaban@seiu1021.org

San Francisco (350 Rhode Island, #100 South Bldg.)
Phone Banks: T/W/Th – 5:30-8p
Precinct Walks: TBA
Volunteer Info: Gabe at gabriel.haaland@seiu1021.org

Santa Rosa (600 B Street)
Phone Banks: T/W/Th – 5:30-8p
Precinct Walks: Sa 9/22 & Sa 9/29 – 9:30a-1p – Campaign Office, 20079 Broadway, Sonoma; Sa 10/13 & Sa 10/20 – Location/Time TBA
Volunteer Info: Mike at michael.weinberg@seiu1021.org; Paul at paul.rodriguez@seiu1021.org

Stockton (37 Hunter Square Plaza)
Phone Banks: M/T/W – 5:30-8p
Precinct Walks: Sa 10a – Meet at Rhodesia Ransom’s campaign HQ, 29 West 10th St., Tracy
Volunteer Info: Andrea at a.colavitapinkham@seiu1021.org

Get Out the Vote (GOTV) – All Offices
Fr 11/2 – Mo 11/5 – 8a-6p

Election Day GOTV (GOTV/Poll checking)
Tu 11/6 – 8a-8p

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Rhodesia Ransom Will Stand Up for San Joaquin County Local 1021 Workers

by Marcus Williams, San Joaquin County COPE Chair

San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors candidate Rhodesia Ransom

As county workers, we have the opportunity and power to elect Rhodesia Ransom, who understands the struggles of working people to the San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors.

Ransom has experienced first-hand the effects of wages and benefit cuts. She understands how employees and their families have to grapple with the skyrocketing costs of healthcare.

How often have we said we need someone on the Board of Supervisors who is one of us? This is an opportunity for us to elect someone who has truly walked in a working family’s shoes instead of just giving lip service to the day-to-day issues, pressures and decisions we face supporting our families.

Ransom is extremely qualified to be a member of the Board of Supervisors. She has 15 years of practical business experience and service to the South San Joaquin County community. Ransom is the Executive Director of a nonprofit organization, current board member of the City of Tracy Planning Commission, community activist and volunteer.

It may sound cliché that we as public employees get to elect our own bosses. However, this is our chance and opportunity to elect a truly qualified candidate who will be the voice of working people.

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Proposition 32 Hurts Our Union Voice

Chip Atkin, Chair, Sonoma County Chapter of SEIU 1021 Committee on Political Education made this statement on Prop 32:

Vote No on Proposition 32!

Proposition 32 purports to be campaign finance reform, that will get the special interest out of politics by prohibiting both corporations and unions from

  1. making political contributions directly to candidates, and
  2. from collecting payroll deductions to fund their political efforts.

It is extremely deceptive and filled with special exemptions for corporations.   There are only a few types of corporations that are affected by the law.  Close held, LLC corporations, real estate trusts, and incorporated Super PAC’s are exempt, not to mention the individual, billionaire CEO’s of Corporations are unaffected.  Prohibiting corporations from doing payroll deductions to fund politics is like prohibiting men from getting pregnant Corporations don’t use payroll deductions to fund their political efforts, they use their business profits.  Corporations will still be able to invest their profits in Super PAC’s, that will give them a loud voice on any political  issue or candidate.

The payroll deduction provision will eliminate unions’ sources of funding, which they use for political efforts to protect working families and the middle class’s interests.  If Proposition 32 passes, we will not be able to fight the attacks on our compensation,  pensions, and union rights.  We’ll not be able to fight the corporate funded attacks on the middle class, that threaten to privatize Social Security (making it less secure for the average person), reduce worker safety regulations (in the name of reducing cumbersome regulation on business), pair back on overtime compensation, and reverse gains in health care coverage.

Corporations already out spend unions 15 to1 in politics.   This proposition only changes the way that corporations spend their money on politics, but it will eliminate the ability of unions to fund any effort to support candidates or issues which are important to working people.  Don’t let corporate interests silence unions. Vote No on Proposition 32.

We encourage everyone to learn how Proposition hurts unions and everyone else who tries to assure that the voice of regular people is heard and acted on.  

Please Act Now to tell other people to vote No on Proposition 32

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SEIU Local 1021 Members Join Governor Jerry Brown at Kick Off for Proposition 30 Campaign

Governor Jerry Brown speaks at Proposition 30 kick-off at New Technology High School

SEIU Local 1021 members along with teachers, parents and students joined Governor Jerry Brown at the kick off for Proposition 30 campaign. Proposition 30 aims to protect schools and public safety by increasing state revenues.

Proposition 30 provides a fair, common-sense solution to ensure that K-12 and community colleges will receive the funding they critically need.

“Proposition 30 prevents $6 billion in cuts this coming budget year,” said Governor Jerry Brown.

Proposition 30 taxes the wealthiest Californians. Individuals who make below $250,000 and families who make below $500,000 will pay no additional income tax. The sales tax will be increased by ¼ of 1 percent. For every $400 spent on taxable goods, there would be an additional $1.00 in sales tax.

“Proposition 30 is the catalyst,” said Crawford Johnson, Local 1021 Second Vice President. “If we don’t approve Prop. 30, we will lose public schools as we know it.”

Many school districts are operating on very lean budgets. In Sacramento City Unified School District, transportation, maintenance and custodial services have been cut. Every service cut impacts children and their families.

“We cannot allow the cuts to critical services to continue,” said Karla Faucett, Vice President for Local 1021 Sacramento City Unified School District. “Proposition 30 will help our schools get back on track.”

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No on Prop 32: Don’t Let Big Corporations Silence Our Voices

Marcus Williams, San Joaquin County COPE Chair

by Marcus Williams

Proposition 32 – The Special Exemptions Act will be on the November ballot.  On the surface it looks and sounds like a good idea.  It claims to ban both corporations and unions from using any funds collected through payroll deductions for politics.

Proposition 32 is unbalanced. The majority of union members in California contribute to politics through payroll deductions which allow unions to collectively pool our resources to support political campaigns benefiting working families and to fight anti-worker political campaigns.

Corporations almost never use payroll deductions for politics.  They use their massive profits.  Corporations and the super-rich can spend with no limits on political campaigns through powerful political action committees.  A United States Supreme Court ruling has deemed corporations to be individuals. This means corporations have the same rights as people.

Corporations can easily out spend us to support laws the benefit them or oppose proposed reform of the existing banking foreclosure laws that have taken homes away from many of us, our friends, neighbors and family members. Whole communities have been decimated by this housing crisis.

Prop. 32 takes away our ability to collective pool our resources to protect the health and safety of our families and communities.  Do not be deceived – Vote No on Prop. 32.

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1021 Political Action Trainings: Yes on 30, No on 32

With two measures on the November ballot, California voters will set a new course for our State. Prop 30, Tax the Rich for Schools and Services, would reverse decades of tax policy that has enriched the wealthiest while starving basic public services like education and healthcare. Prop 32, the Special Exemptions Act, would ban working peoples’ voices in politics, amplifying the power of billionaires and their corporations. It is a deceptive measure that would eliminate our ability to fight budget cuts and layoffs, privatization of public services, and safety on the job.

SEIU Local 1021 is leading the fight on Yes on Prop 30 and No on Prop 32, but it’s going to take all of us to win . 1021 will be kicking off our campaign to educate members on these measures with events that are happening across our Local. We hope that you can join us!

San Francisco – Monday, July 23, 5:30-830pm, 350 Rhode Island

Santa Rosa – Tuesday, July 24, 5:30-8:30pm, 600 B Street

Oakland – Thursday, July 26, 5:30-8:30pm, 100 Oak Street

Fairfield – Thursday, July 26, 5:30-8:30pm, 2300 Boynton Avenue

Sacramento – Saturday, July 28, 9am-12pm, 1006 – 4th Street, 8th Floor

Ukiah – Tuesday, July 31, 5:30-8:30pm, 655 Kings Court; #100

Richmond – Thursday, August 9; 5:30-8:30pm, 1021 Macdonald

Hayward – TBA

Stockton – Saturday, August 11, 9am-12pm, 37 Hunter Square Plaza

For more information on how to get involved in the campaign, contact Chris Daly at chris.daly@seiu1021.org.

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Local 1021 Members Score Victory Over Financial Giant

SEIU Local 1021 and its community allies scored a victory in one of their long-standing battles for economic justice when the Oakland City Council unanimously demanding renegotiation of an old interest rate swap agreement with financial giant Goldman Sachs or risk losing all city business.

“If you listen to what the city council members are saying now, it’s what we’ve been saying for two years,” said Dwight McElroy, president of SEIU Local 1021’s Oakland chapter. “Any aggressive action on Goldman Sachs’ predatory loan will mean more money for the services we are trying to get back.”

The swap deal was made after the City of Oakland floated variable-rate bonds in 1998 to help finance its pension obligations. To protect itself from spiking interest rates city officials took out an interest rate swap with Goldman Sachs that fixed the rate. Instead of spiking up, the rates dropped to about half what the city was paying.

Oakland paid off the bonds as of June 2008, but the city could not terminate the swap agreement without paying a penalty to the bank.  The city has already lost $17.5 million over the last four years, and is locked into this deal until 2021—standing to lose millions more.

Tuesday’s vote calls on Goldman Sachs to let the city out of a 1998 swap agreement without the $15 million penalty. If Goldman Sachs refuses, the measure would require the city stop doing business with the bank.

The move comes as Oakland is once again facing deficits that translate into major cuts in services to the community, as well as layoffs and pay and benefits cuts for its workers, many of whom are SEIU Local 1021 members.

In May, a delegation of Local 1021 members confronted Goldman Sachs executives as a New York City board meeting.

City Council members are unhappy with being bled dry by Goldman Sachs, especially after it received billions in taxpayer bailout funds.

City workers welcome the council’s action with an “about time” shrug.

Oakland is not alone in this situation. More than 1,100 public agencies have made similar swap deals that are costing taxpayers over $2.5 billion annually. In 2011, more than 40 percent of every dollar Goldman Sachs took in went directly to its bonus and compensation pool. For instance, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein was paid $16.2 million last year.

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Solano County Candidates’ Night

Solano County Candidates’ Night
Tuesday, July 17 at 6 p.m.
2300 Boynton Ave., Suite 200
in Fairfield
Join us to meet the Candidates running for Solano County Supervisor, District 1
Erin Hannigan and Tony Intintoli

We will be considering an endorsement in the race. Have your voice heard.
RSVP for dinner required: (877) OUR-1021

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Local 1021 Members Strike Back in June Election

San Joaquin candidate Rhodesia Ransom (2nd from right) with Local 1021 members and staff who phoned and walked for her successful campaign.

Much was at stake in the June primary election. Wisconsin received national attention for the attack on public sector workers, but we weren’t immune in northern California.

Last year during contract negotiations, several counties made callous attempts to impose contracts with huge takeaways in salaries and benefits. The collective bargaining power of Local 1021 members in Mendocino, San Joaquin, Solano and Sonoma counties was fundamentally compromised and forced us to take our fight directly to the politicians who gave us no other choice.

We did well. Overall, our program in this election cycle was very effective across all of northern California. Local 1021 members and staff made more than 10,000 calls and went door-to-door to talk with targeted voters. That effort helped make the difference on election night.

Success in Solano

“After such a difficult contract fight, we knew our best chance to build power in Solano County was to engage politically,” said Jennifer LaRiviere, Solano chapter president. “In early spring our members were on the phones talking to other members about the importance of the June election.”

Our political work led to a strong victory on election night with Skip Thomson, our political ally to the board, knocking out Mike Reagan by 12 points. Reagan, incumbent and chair of the Solano County Board of Supervisors, had spearheaded the imposition threats against Local 1021 members.

Prior to election night Reagan sent a mailer attacking Thompson for working with SEIU. The attack forced members to increase efforts in several ways, which rattled the incumbent. Ten days before the election he complained in the Fairfield Daily Republic that he was under a “barrage” of SEIU phone banking and campaign literature.

“By June 5th we’d knocked on hundreds of doors and made thousands of calls into the district,” LaRiviere said. “It’s an amazing feeling to know that all our hard work paid off with the election of Skip Thomson and Linda Seifert and the passage of Measure L.”

Running strong in San Joaquin

In San Joaquin County, Local 1021 members helped Rhodesia Ransom close most of a 28-point deficit to force a November run-off against Bob Elliot. With this victory, Local 1021 is now in position to continue our organizing in a fight-back from San Joaquin County’s threats of contract imposition.

“It was really great,” said Marcus Williams, chair of the San Joaquin County COPE committee. “Coming from that far behind, this shows what labor and our members can accomplish when we work together.”

Solid in Sonoma

In Sonoma County, we helped Susan Gorin close an early 8-point deficit. She ended the evening just 86 votes behind front-runner John Sawyer. While our members have been in contract negotiations, Sawyer went out of his way to target public sector pensions, pinning blame for budget difficulties on workers.

Chip Atkin, chair of Sonoma County COPE, says the effort by members came through on election night.
“SEIU COPE leaders were active on the phones and precinct walking to close the gap,” he said. “Since this seat represents the balance of power on the Board of Supervisors, we will need to expand our efforts to ensure success for November.”

Recapping our other key races

When nobody stepped up in Mendocino County to challenge board chair John McCowen, Local 1021 Executive Board member Andrea Longoria did. She did not win but her strong showing sent the message that we will not take attacks lying down.

In the East Bay, Local 1021 members helped catapult Peralta’s Measure B parcel tax to victory with 72 percent of the vote. The measure will ensure that Peralta Colleges get access to critical resources in difficult budget times.
In San Francisco’s Democratic Central Committee races, 14 of our 24 endorsed candidates won election.

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SEIU 1021 Finds New Revenue for the City

SEIU 1021 Political Action Chair Alysabeth Alexander (right) and San Francisco Assessor Phil Ting explain to media how they brought new revenue into the City.

San Francisco Assessor Phil Ting publicly announced that his office brought in an extra $50 million in property tax revenues to the City coffers—making up for nearly 20% of next year’s budget deficit. The extra money was a result of a diligent review of properties sold in the last year, sales that triggered a Prop 13 reassessment of their values at their new price. To accomplish that, Ting got a little help from his friends at SEIU 1021.

“We did a little research of our own on commercial properties we suspected changed hands, and turned that information over to the Assessor’s office,” said Alysabeth Alexander, SEIU 1021 Political Action chair. “These were funds legally owed to the City and County of San Francisco by huge companies like JP Morgan Chase and Jiffy Lube. It was flat-out corporate tax evasion that we blew the whistle on.”

As cities and counties everywhere are facing crippling budget deficits, they are responding by cutting services and slashing their employees’ wages and benefits. The cry of “no new taxes,” championed by Republicans and embraced by far too many Democrats, along with California’s two-thirds vote requirement for taxes, has made raising new revenue difficult. So SEIU 1021 has turned some of its energy to enforcing tax laws that already exist, but that corporations have made a science and an art of avoiding.

At his press conference Ting pointed out that since San Francisco is both a city and county, about half that new money will go to the state. But even so, the $24 million that will go to the General Fund will go a long way for saving some City programs staring at the chopping block. If proportionally divvied up as the rest of the budget is, Ting estimated that it will provide an additional $9.5 million for police, fire and public protection, $6.5 million more for human services and neighborhood development and $5.25 million more for community health services.

While the San Francisco School District does not get its money directly from the City’s General Fund, Ting estimated it will receive an additional $4.5 million from the new revenue because a percentage of the property tax money sent to the state comes back to fund schools.

The teachers union’s Executive Vice President Linda Plack, present at the press conference, noted that the new money will put a dent in the district’s deficit, allowing 92 teachers who had received pink slips to be recalled, even though there will be 200 fewer next year than this last one.

“Here, San Francisco values are more than just lip service,” she said of the allocated funds.

SEIU 1012’s Alexander noted that the new revenue was very welcome in a situation where City workers have been making concessions for the last few years and many of the non-profit service providers the union represents are facing more cuts this year.

“It’s exciting to see other ways than cuts to deal with the budget deficit,” she said. “This gives hope to City workers and community people who rely on these services.”

Ting added that Mayor Ed Lee is allocating another $1 million to his office to add 15 more staffers to find and collect more money owed the City, estimating they could come up with another $30 million.

“Even Wall Street would be happy with that kind of return,” he quipped.

The actions to make corporations pay their fair share are part of a nationwide SEIU Fight for a Fair Economy campaign.

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Local 1021 Members Propel Ransom into November Run-Off Election

San Joaquin County chapter member Megan Escudero phone banks for GOTV.

In a hotly-contested race for San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors, SEIU Local 1021 members propelled Rhodesia Ransom into a November run-off election by educating voters on the importance of electing a pro-labor candidate who represents the community’s interests.

Ransom, a Tracy planning commissioner and nonprofit director, strongly opposes outsourcing jobs to private contractors. Ransom believes a permanent county job should be fulltime. Ransom supports public schools, health care for all, and wants to hold banks accountable to modify home loans and stop foreclosures.

“As a county employee, I have the ability to vote for my boss,” said Martha Smith, San Joaquin County appraiser. “It’s important that I let my co-workers know who will have a positive impact on our worksites as well as the community as a whole.”

Opponent Bob Elliott has discussed privatizing the county hospitals, contracting out and “two-tier” systems during his campaign. These campaign items could lead to wage reductions and layoffs.

“It’s important to phone bank because so many people are not informed about the candidates,” said Megan Escudero, San Joaquin County eligibility worker. “We have the opportunity to give voters information to make an informed decision.”

The Local 1021 Committee on Political Education (C.O.P.E.) spearheaded voter education efforts in the election.

“We need to get more members involved in C.O.P.E. so they will be informed at election time,” said Peggy LaRossa, San Joaquin County accountant.

To get involved with C.O.P.E., contact your chapter’s leadership, a Local 1021 field representative, or contact the Member Resource Center at 1.877.687.1021.

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SOS: Save Our Schools (and everything else)!

Overcrowded classrooms, laid-off teachers, overstretched police and public safety services. After four years of deep cuts, the Golden State has lost its shine. The all-cuts approach hasn’t worked, and regular, working people and their families (your families!) are paying the price. We can’t afford more cuts to our vital services. It’s time to invest in California’s comeback.

The Schools and Local Public Safety Protection Act of 2012 is the only initiative that takes care of the whole state. By replenishing the state’s General Fund, it funds schools, cities and counties. It raises up to $9 billion a year for education, health and dental care, child care, police, fire, parks, transportation and programs for seniors, disabled and the poor.

How it does this

It is a Millionaires’ Tax that asks the richest Californians to pay their fair share to help fund public education and vital public services; it pays down the debt we owe to schools, and does not raise income taxes on the poor or middle class.

It guarantees that new revenue for education will be spent on schools at the local level, not administrative costs or Sacramento bureaucracy. It also requires transparency through a public audit when funds are allocated, so Californians can ensure our schools are getting the money they deserve.

The other tax initiative proposal currently in circulation is well-intentioned, but places a massive tax burden on those who can least afford it, even raising income taxes on Californians making less than $8,000 a year! It also does nothing to close the budget deficit or pay down the debt to education.

Governor Brown’s new revenue Plan offers a solution. The Schools and Local Public Safety Protection Act of 2012 is a critical part of it. It is essential that we pass the Act in November to avoid additional devastating cuts to our most critical programs. This initiative gives us the best chance to avoid these cuts.

Act! Here! Now!

We only have a few weeks left to gather enough signatures to qualify it for the November ballot. Please help all Californians in this critical effort and join our signature-gathering drive today.

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Jerry Allen for Sonoma County Retirement Board

The only SEIU 1021 member on the Sonoma County retirement board, Jerry Allen, is up for reelection. The union has endorsed him over his challenger, an attorney from the county counsel’s office.

“I believe we need labor advocates with the perspective of the rank and file on the board, voices of the common people,” said Allen, who works in the county’s Human Services department.

The Sonoma County Employees Retirement Association’s board controls the pension fund’s investments and decides its strategies and policies. In accordance with California law, it contracts an actuarial firm to perform valuations of the fund every year and external professional investment firms to manage it.

Allen has served on the board for eight years and is currently its chair and chair of its Investment Committee. There he continues to work to diversify the fund’s investments, making it safer and members’ pensions more secure.

He led the successful fight to make sure sick leave would not be subtracted from time of service when calculating a worker’s pension.

“That would have discriminated against those with dependents who often have to take time off to care for them,” Allen said.

Ballots have already been mailed out and are due back by 5pm on December 6 to the Sonoma County Registrar of Voters at 435 Fiscal Drive Santa Rosa, CA 95403.  The ROV is open from 8am-5pm.  Ballots can be mailed in or walked in to the ROV.

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SEIU 1021-supported Measures and Candidates Fare Well in November 8 Elections

In a very tight election for the Fairfield City Council, the candidate endorsed by SEIU 1021 — Pam Bertani — not only beat incumbent Chuck Timm by 125 votes but unseated appointed council member Rick Vacarro. As the polls opened on election day, Bertani actually trailed Timm in absentee votes, but by mid-morning our get-out-the-vote efforts helped give her the lead, which she kept throughout the day.

Bertani’s election was just the start. Most of the candidates and ballot measures supported by SEIU 1021 prevailed on Tuesday.

In San Rafael, Damon Connolly won election to the city council. Across the bay, Jacqueline Asher won a seat on the Emeryville City Council. And in San Francisco, Ross Mirkarimi appears to have won election as sheriff; votes are still being counted, but he’s leading his second-place opponent by a solid 10 percent.

Schools had a good day. In Solano County, Joe DiPaola won election to the Dixon Unified School District board; westward in Marin, Eva Long and Stephanie O’Brien took two of the four open seats on the Community College Board. And Mendocino County member Megan Van Sant was elected to the Ukiah school board.

Despite the apparent election of Ed Lee (whom we did not endorse; again, votes are still being counted) as mayor, San Francisco was the scene of another big SEIU 1021 victory: Proposition C (which the city’s unions drafted in negotiations with Lee) easily beat the competing Prop D for a reform of the city’s pension system that could save $1.3 billion over the next ten years. All in all, our positions prevailed in six of the eight measures on the San Francisco ballot.

Taking the measure of measures

A statewide analysis of revenue measures by the League of California Cities revealed a trend that bucks conventional wisdom:

“Voters on Tuesday approved 82 percent of the 22 non-school tax-related measures, compared to a 65 percent passage rate from 2001 to 2010 …

“Roughly 70 percent of the 16 special tax proposals, which required the support of two-thirds of voters, were approved Tuesday. The passage rate for such measures for the previous 10 years was 46 percent.”

One of those two-thirds measures was Mendocino County’s Measure A, which won with three-quarters of the vote: a 1/8-cent sales tax to save county library services.

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